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Diseases of Public Health Significance
(Reportable Diseases)

As of May 1, 2018, “Reportable Diseases” are now referred to as “Diseases of Public Health Significance”. Malaria and yellow fever are no longer reportable.

Download the full Diseases of Public Health Significance List 

Health care providers who suspect or have confirmation of the “Diseases of Public Health Significance”, or their “etiologic agents”, as per Ontario Reg 135/18 and amendments under the Health Protection and Promotion Act, must report them to the local Medical Officer of Health.

When to Report:

During business hours (Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) all diseases must be reported to Peterborough Public Health immediately.

  • Fax: 705-743-2897 OR Phone: 705-743-1000

Outside of business hours (including weekends and holidays), only the diseases with an asterisk * must be reported immediately by phone to the on-call staff at 705-760-8127.  All other diseases can be reported the next business day.


Diseases of Public Health Significance

  • Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)
  • Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
  • Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP)
  • Adverse Events Following Immunization (AEFIs)
  • Amebiasis
  • *Animal Bite or Scratch from Any Animal (Domestic or Wild)
  • *Anthrax
  • Blastomycosis
  • *Botulism
  • *Brucellosis
  • Campylobacter enteritis
  • Carbapenamase-producing-Enterobacteriaceae (CPE)
  • Chancroid
  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Chlamydia trachomatis infections
  • Cholera
  • *Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI) outbreaks in Public Hospitals
  • *Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, all types
  • Cryptosporidiosis
  • Cyclosporiasis
  • *Diphtheria
  • Echinoccoccus multilocularis
  • Encephalitis, including:
    1. Primary, viral
    2. Post-infectious
    3. Vaccine-related
    4. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis
    5. Unspecified
  • Food poisoning, all causes
  • *Gastroenteritis, institutional outbreaks & public hospitals
  • Giardiasis (except asymptomatic cases)
  • Gonorrhea
  • *Group A Streptococcal disease, invasive
  • Group B Streptococcal disease, neonatal
  • *Haemophilus influenzae all types, invasive
  • *Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
  • *Hemorrhagic fevers, including:
    1. *Ebola virus disease
    2. *Marburg virus disease
    3. *Lassa Fever
    4. *Other viral causes
  • *Hepatitis, viral
    1. *Hepatitis A
    2. Hepatitis B
    3. Hepatitis C
  • Influenza
  • Legionellosis
  • Leprosy
  • Listeriosis
  • Lyme Disease
  • *Measles
  • *Meningitis, acute
    1. *Bacterial
    2. Viral
    3. Other
  • *Meningococcal disease, invasive
  • Mumps
  • *Novel coronavirus diseases, including:
    1. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
    2. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)
    3. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
  • Ophthalmia neonatorum
  • Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP)
  • Paratyphoid Fever
  • Pertussis (Whooping Cough)
  • *Plague
  • Pneumococcal disease, invasive (Streptococcus pneumoniae)\
  • *Poliomyelitis, acute
  • Psittacosis/Ornithosis
  • *Q Fever
  • *Rabies
  • *Respiratory infection outbreaks in institutions & public hospitals
  • Rubella
  • Rubella, congenital syndrome
  • Salmonellosis
  • *Shigellosis
  • *Smallpox
  • Syphilis
  • Tetanus
  • Trichinosis
  • Tuberculosis
  • Tularemia
  • Typhoid Fever
  • *Verotoxin-producing E. coli infection indicator conditions including:
    Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS)
  • West Nile Virus illness
  • Yersiniosis