May 21,

School Based Clinics

School Based Clinics

School-Based Vaccinations

Three school-based vaccines: meningococcal C-ACYW-135 (Menactra), hepatitis B (HB) and human papillomavirus (HPV) are offered to grade 7 students free of charge. These vaccines have been used for many years.  You cannot get the disease from the vaccine.  Every dose is monitored for reactions and any reactions are reported through provincial and federal vaccine reporting systems.

For School-Based Clinic schedules, consent forms and More Information, Click Here.

 

Meningococcal

Many people carry the meningococcal bacteria in their nose or throat without feeling sick.  It is spread through close, direct contact.  Examples of how the bacteria are spread include:  kissing, coughing, or sharing things like food or drinks.  The bacteria can lead to meningitis which can cause brain damage and sometimes death.

Most Ontarians have received a meningococcal vaccine as an infant that protects against one type of bacteria.  The Grade 7 vaccine is different as it protects against 4 types of bacteria. It protects 80% to 85% of teens against disease caused by these four bacteria.

This vaccine is REQUIRED under the Immunization of School Pupils Act.

Hepatitis B

HB is a virus that spread easily through blood and bodily fluids.  The virus can stay alive on things like razors and toothbrushes for up to one week.  It can cause damage, swelling or cancer of the liver.  Each year in Ontario, HB leads to about:  350 deaths, 300 cancers and 90 cases of swollen or damaged livers.

If all doses are received, the vaccine is 95%-100% effective.  The protection lasts at least 15 years or more for most people.

This vaccine is not required under the Immunization of School Pupils Act, but highly recommended by the Medical Officer of Health.

Human Papillomavirus

HPV can cause genital warts and cancers (cervical, anal, genital, mouth and throat).  It is spread through skin-to-skin contact (kissing or touching) with the genital areas (penis, scrotum, vagina, vulva, and anus) of a person who has the infection.  Many people with HPV do not know they have the virus and can infect others.

This vaccine can prevent most cases of cervical cancer if all doses are given before a person becomes sexually active.  It is also effective in preventing some other cancers as well as genital warts in males and females.

This vaccine is not required under the Immunization of School Pupils Act, but highly recommended by the Medical Officer of Health.

*For the 2016-2017 school year, the HPV vaccine will be offered to both boys and girls in grade 7 and girls in grade 8.

Last modified on Jul 27, 2017