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January 25, 2018 – ‘Family Literacy Day’ Highlights Value of Talking, Playing or Reading with Children to Encourage Literacy

Spending a few minutes each day to improve a child’s literacy skills is a worthwhile investment of time that can pay off in life-long benefits for the entire family.

Peterborough Public Health is promoting that message in the lead up to Family Literacy Day (www.familyliteracyday.ca) on January 27. The awareness day promotes the importance of adults talking, listening, playing and reading with children to help develop strong literacy skills for life.

“Making literacy-related activities part of your daily routine on Family Literacy Day – and every day of the year – is key to improving your child’s speech and language skills,” says Leisa Baker, a Public Health Nurse with Peterborough Public Health. “All it takes is 15 minutes a day, and what you’re doing is not only spending quality time together as a family, you’re helping support strong literacy skills that are essential for children to reach their full potential in our changing and dynamic world.”

There are many fun ways that families can encourage literacy skills, without children even realizing it is learning, Baker adds. Reading a book at bedtime, visiting the library, playing a board game together, doing an alphabet scavenger hunt or telling knock-knock jokes while doing the dishes can all be options.

Another way for families to encourage literacy with children is to point out how reading and writing show up in everyday activities, such as reading traffic signs while driving or writing a grocery list at home.

Local families should also check with their local library to see if there are special events planned in their community or join the celebrations in downtown Peterborough at Peterborough Square, http://www.ptbocanada.com/upcoming-events/2017/1/28/peterborough-family-literacy-day

Literacy activities, resources, and speech and language milestones are also available at the KidTalk website (www.kidtalk.on.ca). The KidTalk website is part of the Preschool Speech and Language Services program that covers Haliburton County, Northumberland County, the City of Kawartha Lakes, and the County and City of Peterborough. If you have questions or would like a screening of your child’s speech and language skills, please call Peterborough Public Health’s Family HEALTHline at 705-743-1000.

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For further information, please contact:

Leisa Baker, R.N.
Public Health Nurse

705-743-1000, ext. 312

January 16, 2018 – To view the meeting summary from the January 16 Board of Health Meeting click the image below:

BOH meeting summary screenshot

January 13, 2018, -Alert Covers the City and County of Peterborough and Curve Lake and Hiawatha First Nations

Peterborough Public Health has issued the third Frostbite Alert of the season because of forecasted nightly wind chill values of -30 or lower from January 13 to 14. Temperatures are expected to rise above Frostbite Alert criteria during the evening of Sunday, January 14.

Extreme cold events are a potentially significant health risk and can have a severe impact on the health of vulnerable populations including infants, the elderly, people with circulatory problems, and the marginally housed.  Local social service agencies rely on Peterborough Public Health frostbite alerts to determine if services should be extended or enhanced.

In order to protect the health of people in Peterborough County and City and Curve Lake and Hiawatha First Nations, Peterborough Public Health advises local residents to take the following precautions:

  • Check face and extremities frequently for signs of frostbite. Exposed skin can freeze in as little as 10 to 30 minutes.
  • Consider re-scheduling outdoor recreational activities, especially during the evening. There is a serious risk of hypothermia and frostbite if outdoors for long periods.
  • Use caution when shoveling snow especially for those that have heart, respiratory (breathing) problems or other medical conditions. Snow shoveling is strenuous and can cause an onset of heart or respiratory problems.
  • Check on the elderly or people with disabilities living alone.

What clothing should be worn outdoors?

Always wear clothing appropriate for the weather. Synthetic and wool fabrics provide better insulation. Some synthetic fabrics are designed to keep perspiration away from your body which keep you dry and further reduce your risk.

Here are some useful tips:

  • Dress in layers with a wind resistant outer layer. You can remove layers if you get too warm (before you start sweating) or add a layer if you get cold.
  • Wear warm socks, gloves, a hat and scarf in cold weather. Be sure to cover your nose to protect it.
  • If you get wet, change into dry clothing as soon as possible. You lose heat faster when you’re wet.

Cold related illnesses include:

Hypothermia:
Symptoms/signs include: shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling/uncoordinated movements, memory loss, slurred speech, drowsiness.

Frostbite:
Symptoms/signs include: white/greyish skin area, skin that feels unusually firm or waxy, or numbness.

Increases in other health problems can also be seen, especially for those with other chronic medical conditions such as heart conditions.

Further information about the health risks of extreme cold and the Health Unit’s Extreme Cold Response Plan can be found at www.pcchu.ca under “My Home & Environment” by clicking on “Extreme Weather – Cold”.

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For further information, please contact:

Brittany Cadence

Communications Manager

705-743-1000, ext. 391

 

While many of us can handle a cold spell, frostbite and other cold weather injuries are a real risk for young infants, the elderly, those with blood circulation conditions, and for people who don’t have stable housing.  Make sure you know the signs and symptoms of frostbite and hypothermia, and check in on anyone you know who may be vulnerable to extreme cold to ensure they are kept warm.

January 10, 2018 – Location: J.K. Edwards Board Room, Peterborough Public Health, Jackson Square, 185 King St., Third Floor

Media and the community are advised that the next Board of Health meeting will take place on Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 9:00 a.m.

This meeting is taking place on a Saturday to align with the annual Board of Health planning session that will occur immediately following the meeting.

To download the agenda and the online board package, please visit:

http://www.peterboroughpublichealth.ca/about-us/about-us-2/board-of-health/meeting-agendas

This meeting is open to the community and members of the media.  Guests are asked to use the buzzer located on the wall to the right of the main front doors to alert Peterborough Public Health staff when they arrive.  The board room is located on the third floor of Jackson Square, 185 King St. Free parking is available after 6 p.m. on the street or across the road at the King St. Parkade.

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For further information, please contact:
Brittany Cadence
Communications Manager
705-743-1000, ext. 391

January 4, 2018 – Today Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Rosana Salvaterra declared a community-wide influenza outbreak in Peterborough due to a recent increase in the number of confirmed local cases.

“We now have influenza outbreaks at four long term care homes in our area, and have seen an increased number of patients presenting at the PRHC Emergency Department with influenza-like illness,” said Dr. Salvaterra.  “We have been seeing an increase in influenza cases ever since the Christmas holiday began and now we have enough evidence to believe there is widespread transmission occurring.”

“There is no reason to believe that this year’s vaccine is not a strong match with circulating strains,” she said.  Dr. Salvaterra noted that all of the long-term care homes in outbreak have instructed staff who did not get the flu shot to take antiviral medication. “Antivirals can be effective as a second line treatment to prevent influenza spread when outbreaks occur or to treat an influenza infection, if used early. Hopefully, most caregivers have been immunized but if not, antivirals, masks and good hand washing can help protect those who are vulnerable.”

 

Most healthy individuals are able to weather the virus and will not require a visit to the doctor. For those who are feeling unwell, Dr. Salvaterra recommends that you stay home to avoid spreading the virus. However, people with compromised immune systems, other chronic diseases, or even a healthy woman in her last trimester of pregnancy are at greater risk of hospitalization and death from influenza. Anyone who has symptoms of influenza and risk factors for severe illness or complications should seek medical care as soon as possible. “Physicians and Nurse Practitioners are prescribing antivirals for patients who might benefit from them, but this needs to be done within the first 24 to 48 hours of the illness,” said Dr. Salvaterra.

For more information about infection control  and influenza, please visit www.peterboroughpublichealth.ca and click on “Immunization” and then “Influenza”.

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For further information, please contact:

Brittany Cadence

Communications Manager

705-743-1000, ext. 391

 

 

January 4, 2018 – Alert Covers the City and County of Peterborough and Curve Lake and Hiawatha First Nations

Peterborough Public Health is extending the Frostbite Alert issued December 26, 2017 because of forecasted nightly wind chill values of -39°C from January 4, 2018 to January 6, 2018. Temperatures are expected to rise above the Frostbite Alert level during the day of January 7, 2018.

Extreme cold events are a potentially significant health risk and can have a severe impact on the health of vulnerable populations including infants, the elderly, people with circulatory problems, and the marginally housed.  Local social service agencies rely on Peterborough Public Health frostbite alerts to determine if services should be extended or enhanced.

In order to protect the health of people in Peterborough County and City and Curve Lake and Hiawatha First Nations, Peterborough Public Health advises local residents to take the following precautions:

  • Check face and extremities frequently for signs of frostbite. Exposed skin can freeze in as little as 10 to 30 minutes.
  • Consider re-scheduling outdoor recreational activities, especially during the evening. There is a serious risk of hypothermia and frostbite if outdoors for long periods.
  • Use caution when shoveling snow especially for those that have heart, respiratory (breathing) problems or other medical conditions. Snow shoveling is strenuous and can cause an onset of heart or respiratory problems.
  • Check on the elderly or people with disabilities living alone.

What clothing should be worn outdoors?

Always wear clothing appropriate for the weather. Synthetic and wool fabrics provide better insulation. Some synthetic fabrics are designed to keep perspiration away from your body which keep you dry and further reduce your risk.

Here are some useful tips:

  • Dress in layers with a wind resistant outer layer. You can remove layers if you get too warm (before you start sweating) or add a layer if you get cold.
  • Wear warm socks, gloves, a hat and scarf in cold weather. Be sure to cover your nose to protect it.
  • If you get wet, change into dry clothing as soon as possible. You lose heat faster when you’re wet.

Cold related illnesses include:

Hypothermia:
Symptoms/signs include: shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling/uncoordinated movements, memory loss, slurred speech, drowsiness. Frostbite:           

Symptoms/signs include: white/greyish skin area, skin that feels unusually firm or waxy, or numbness.

Increases in other health problems can also be seen, especially for those with other chronic medical conditions such as heart conditions.

Further information about the health risks of extreme cold and the Health Unit’s Extreme Cold Response Plan can be found at www.pcchu.ca under “My Home & Environment” by clicking on “Extreme Weather – Cold”.

 

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For further information, please contact:

Brittany Cadence
Communications Manager
705-743-1000, ext. 391

 

January, 4, 2017 – Peterborough Public Health Offers a Chance to Win $100 Gift Card by Sharing Feedback About Local Campaign

Did you see these posters and rink board ads featuring the “Children See, Children Learn” campaign in local arenas over the past year?

If so, Peterborough Public Health wants to hear from you.

“Peterborough Public Health is supporting a province-wide campaign that provides parents with tools and suggestions to guide their children in a positive way,” explained Karly Jessup, Public Health Nurse who coordinated the local promotional campaign. “Through this brief survey we’re hoping to determine if our marketing strategy was effective, as our main goal was to encourage parents to visit the campaign’s website to check out all sorts of informative online resources on positive discipline.”

People who have seen the campaign materials are invited to take part in a very quick survey found here and at www.peterboroughpublichealth.ca. Several local arenas featured the campaign ads on posters and on rink boards over the last year, and Peterborough Public Health is asking for feedback on their impact.

The central element of the campaign is a website for parents of children aged zero to six years old: www.ChildrenSeeChildrenLearn.ca. The website offers short videos that show positive discipline techniques.

Peterborough Public Health is offering a chance to win a $100 gift card for Sportchek for those who complete the survey. The survey takes less than two minutes to complete and then participants can enter their name into the draw.

Ms. Jessup noted that parenting can be very challenging, and that it is sometimes difficult for parents to find positive ways to guide their child’s behaviour. Too often, in stressful situations, parents resort to physical and emotional punishments. Children then learn it is okay to act in a similar way with others. Research is clearly showing physical and emotional punishment can harm children and may have negative lasting impacts on their relationships with others.

To find out more about this campaign or survey please contact Public Health Nurse, Karly Jessup, at 705-743-1000, ext. 215.

To find out about positive child discipline, visit: www.ChildrenSeeChildrenLearn.ca.

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For further information, please contact:
Karly Jessup, RN
Public Health Nurse
705-743-1000, ext. 215

December 29, 2017 – Alert Covers the City and County of Peterborough and Curve Lake and Hiawatha First Nations

Peterborough Public Health is extending the Frostbite Alert issued December 26, 2017 because of forecasted nightly wind chill values of -27°C or lower from December 29, 2017 to January 1, 2018.  Temperatures are expected to rise above the Frostbite Alert level during the day of January 1, 2018.

Extreme cold events are a potentially significant health risk and can have a severe impact on the health of vulnerable populations including infants, the elderly, people with circulatory problems, and the marginally housed.  Local social service agencies rely on Peterborough Public Health frostbite alerts to determine if services should be extended or enhanced.

In order to protect the health of people in Peterborough County and City and Curve Lake and Hiawatha First Nations, Peterborough Public Health advises local residents to take the following precautions:

  • Check face and extremities frequently for signs of frostbite. Exposed skin can freeze in as little as 10 to 30 minutes.
  • Consider re-scheduling outdoor recreational activities, especially during the evening.  There is a serious risk of hypothermia and frostbite if outdoors for long periods.
  • Use caution when shoveling snow especially for those that have heart, respiratory (breathing) problems or other medical conditions. Snow shoveling is strenuous and can cause an onset of heart or respiratory problems.
  • Check on the elderly or people with disabilities living alone.

What clothing should be worn outdoors?

Always wear clothing appropriate for the weather. Synthetic and wool fabrics provide better insulation.  Some synthetic fabrics are designed to keep perspiration away from your body which keep you dry and further reduce your risk.

Here are some useful tips:

  • Dress in layers with a wind resistant outer layer. You can remove layers if you get too warm (before you start sweating) or add a layer if you get cold.
  • Wear warm socks, gloves, a hat and scarf in cold weather. Be sure to cover your nose to protect it.
  • If you get wet, change into dry clothing as soon as possible. You lose heat faster when you’re wet.

Cold related illnesses include:

Hypothermia:
Symptoms/signs include: shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling/uncoordinated movements, memory loss, slurred speech, drowsiness.

Frostbite:           

Symptoms/signs include: white/greyish skin area, skin that feels unusually firm or waxy, or numbness.

Increases in other health problems can also be seen, especially for those with other chronic medical conditions such as heart conditions.

Further information about the health risks of extreme cold and the Health Unit’s Extreme Cold Response Plan can be found at www.pcchu.ca under “My Home & Environment” by clicking on “Extreme Weather – Cold”.

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For further information, please contact:
Brittany Cadence
Communications Manager
705-743-1000, ext. 391

 

When the weather gets this cold, please check in on others like the elderly to make sure they are staying warm enough.  If you must go outside, do dress appropriately by covering up as much as possible as frostbite can develop very quickly on exposed skin during periods of extreme cold. Wear waterproof and windproof outer layers, as brightly coloured as possible if you’re going to be out in the snow, and choose warm mittens instead of gloves.  Avoid getting wet and change into dry clothing as soon as possible if you do get wet from precipitation, sweat or from falling in water.

December 26, 2017 – Alert Covers the City and County of Peterborough and

Curve Lake and Hiawatha First Nations

Peterborough Public Health has issued the second Frostbite Alert of the season because of forecasted nightly wind chill values of -27 or lower from December 26 to 29. Temperatures are expected to rise above Frostbite Alert criteria during the late evening of Friday, December 29, 2017.

Extreme cold events are a potentially significant health risk and can have a severe impact on the health of vulnerable populations including infants, the elderly, people with circulatory problems, and the marginally housed.  Local social service agencies rely on Peterborough Public Health frostbite alerts to determine if services should be extended or enhanced.

In order to protect the health of people in Peterborough County and City and Curve Lake and Hiawatha First Nations, Peterborough Public Health advises local residents to take the following precautions:

  • Check face and extremities frequently for signs of frostbite. Exposed skin can freeze in as little as 10 to 30 minutes.
  • Consider re-scheduling outdoor recreational activities, especially during the evening. There is a serious risk of hypothermia and frostbite if outdoors for long periods.
  • Use caution when shoveling snow especially for those that have heart, respiratory (breathing) problems or other medical conditions. Snow shoveling is strenuous and can cause an onset of heart or respiratory problems.
  • Check on the elderly or people with disabilities living alone.

What clothing should be worn outdoors?

Always wear clothing appropriate for the weather. Synthetic and wool fabrics provide better insulation. Some synthetic fabrics are designed to keep perspiration away from your body which keep you dry and further reduce your risk.

Here are some useful tips:

  • Dress in layers with a wind resistant outer layer. You can remove layers if you get too warm (before you start sweating) or add a layer if you get cold.
  • Wear warm socks, gloves, a hat and scarf in cold weather. Be sure to cover your nose to protect it.
  • If you get wet, change into dry clothing as soon as possible. You lose heat faster when you’re wet.

Cold related illnesses include:

Hypothermia:
Symptoms/signs include: shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling/uncoordinated movements, memory loss, slurred speech, drowsiness.

 

Frostbite:
Symptoms/signs include: white/greyish skin area, skin that feels unusually firm or waxy, or numbness.

Increases in other health problems can also be seen, especially for those with other chronic medical conditions such as heart conditions.

Further information about the health risks of extreme cold and the Health Unit’s Extreme Cold Response Plan can be found at www.pcchu.ca under “My Home & Environment” by clicking on “Extreme Weather – Cold”.

-30-

For further information, please contact:

Brittany Cadence
Communications Manager
705-743-1000, ext. 391

December 18, 2017 – To view the meeting summary of the December Board of Health meeting click the image below:

BOH Meeting Summary December